Thursday, April 17, 2014

Archdiocese of Milwaukee bankruptcy plan to be put to vote | FOX 11 Online | WLUK-TV

 

The archdiocese has maintained that it is liable only for abuse committed by its priests, and people who were abused by religious order priests or lay people working in schools or parishes should seek compensation from those organizations. Victims believe the archdiocese has responsibility for all priests and lay people working within its boundaries.

Bankruptcy Judge Susan Kelley told the archdiocese’s lawyers to explain in documents going to creditors why the plan divided victims into groups to be paid or not paid instead of turning the money over to them and letting them decide how to divide it up, which is how other church bankruptcies have been handled.

Read the entire article by clicking on the following:  Archdiocese of Milwaukee bankruptcy plan to be put to vote | FOX 11 Online | WLUK-TV

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Weekly Contribution for the weekend of April 13, 2014

 

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Newark Archbishop's Pricey Pad Causes Controversy - Yahoo

 

A half-million dollar renovation to the "weekend" home of the Archbishop of Newark has sparked a major controversy, raising questions about how money donated by church members is being used.

An online petition created by a D.C.-based website, Faithful America, has received more than 23,000 signatures to stop the renovation process, claiming that Archbishop John J. Myers does not need a 7,500-square-foot home for when he retires.

Read more of the story by clicking on the followingNewark Archbishop's Pricey Pad Causes Controversy - Yahoo

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Belvidere Daily Republican: Construction project set to begin at St. James


By Tricia Goecks
Editor
BELVIDERE – When Bishop Thomas Doran was a seminary student in the late 1950s, he was told by Bishop Loras Lane that Belvidere needed a new church. The need was unmet ...for over 50 years until Father Brian Geary arrived at St. James Catholic Church in July 2008 and Doran gave the go ahead for the project to begin in earnest. “There has been a great need for it for all these decades,” Geary said.
The original plan was to tear down the church and rectory and build a larger church in its footprint. Following the retirement of Doran, Bishop David Malloy changed the scope of the project to add on to the existing church instead of tearing down and replacing the existing church.
St. James conducted a capital campaign to solicit pledges from its parishioners. Among the churchgoers, they have a 90 percent participation rate in the capital campaign. “It is very encouraging that we have that level of support,” Geary said.
Geary was encouraged and touched by the participation of the Catholic youth. “In the middle of our first campaign, three years ago there was a server. I think he was about 8th grade age and he said sheepishly he wanted to tell me something before Mass. For a kid it is hard to get up the nerve to ask the priest to ask a question or talk to him,” Geary said. “And he told me ‘Father I got $50 for my birthday party over the weekend and I want to give it all to the church.’ ”
“Children can be so generous and they are not as worried as adults about how am I going to make it.”
“There are people who live in very, very modest homes here in Belvidere and they have given very sacrificially and generously,” Geary added. “It tells there are people here who you wouldn’t think have the means or generosity and that this campaign and brought out this hidden virtue”
“I am grateful for that. “
Since Jan. 5, parishioners have volunteered their time and efforts to help prepare St. James for the construction project. In addition to demolition work, the pews, organ, Stations of the Cross, altar and relics were relocated and the carpeting torn up to the subflooring level. “It is going to save us a significant amount of money,” Geary stated. Due to the construction, Masses are being held in the gym.
Once the construction is complete, the seating capacity will increase from 320 people to 900 people. “The bishop has determined that if we build on to this church we could serve all of Boone County,” Geary said.
In addition to Geary, St. James is served by Father John Earl. Earl celebrates many of the Spanish language Masses at St. James. “His Spanish is much better than mine,” Geary added.
Geary and Earl are joined by retired priest Thomas Bartolomeo and Deacon James Olson.
The project that was over 50 years in the making will begin construction this week.See More

Photo: Construction project set to begin at St. James<br /><br />By Tricia Goecks<br />Editor<br /><br />BELVIDERE – When Bishop Thomas Doran was a seminary student in the late 1950s, he was told by Bishop Loras Lane that Belvidere needed a new church. The need was unmet for over 50 years until Father Brian Geary arrived at St. James Catholic Church in July 2008 and Doran gave the go ahead for the project to begin in earnest. “There has been a great need for it for all these decades,” Geary said.<br /><br />The original plan was to tear down the church and rectory and build a larger church in its footprint.  Following the retirement of Doran, Bishop David Malloy changed the scope of the project to add on to the existing church instead of tearing down and replacing the existing church. <br /><br />St. James conducted a capital campaign to solicit pledges from its parishioners. Among the churchgoers, they have a 90 percent participation rate in the capital campaign. “It is very encouraging that we have that level of support,” Geary said.<br /><br />Geary was encouraged and touched by the participation of the Catholic youth. “In the middle of our first campaign, three years ago there was a server. I think he was about 8th grade age and he said sheepishly he wanted to tell me something before Mass. For a kid it is hard to get up the nerve to ask the priest to ask a question or talk to him,” Geary said. “And he told me ‘Father I got $50 for my birthday party over the weekend and I want to give it all to the church.’ ”<br /><br />“Children can be so generous and they are not as worried as adults about how am I going to make it.”<br /><br />“There are people who live in very, very modest homes here in Belvidere and they have given very sacrificially and generously,” Geary added.  “It tells there are people here who you wouldn’t think have the means or generosity and that this campaign and brought out this hidden virtue” <br />“I am grateful for that. “<br /><br />Since Jan. 5, parishioners have volunteered their time and efforts to help prepare St. James for the construction project.  In addition to demolition work, the pews, organ, Stations of the Cross, altar and relics were relocated and the carpeting torn up to the subflooring level. “It is going to save us a significant amount of money,” Geary stated.  Due to the construction, Masses are being held in the gym. <br /><br />Once the construction is complete, the seating capacity will increase from 320 people to 900 people. “The bishop has determined that if we build on to this church we could serve all of Boone County,” Geary said.<br /><br />In addition to Geary, St. James is served by Father John Earl. Earl celebrates many of the Spanish language Masses at St. James. “His Spanish is much better than mine,” Geary added.<br /><br />Geary and Earl are joined by retired priest Thomas Bartolomeo and Deacon James Olson.<br /><br />The project that was over 50 years in the making will begin construction this week.

Ground Breaking

 

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Click on the photocopy to enlarge:

Weekly Contribution for the weekend of April 6, 2014

 

 

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Tuesday, April 8, 2014

Abuse victims call Archdiocesan bankruptcy plan 'repugnant'

 

The archdiocese has argued from the beginning that it has limited resources to compensate victims. It says it has already paid more than $33 million in settlement and therapy costs over the years, including $8.25 million of a $17 million settlement in a California case brought by victims of Wisconsin priests who had been transferred there.

So far, creditors have yet to obtain a single asset of significance for the bankruptcy estate.

Kelley ruled in December 2012 that creditors could not tap the assets of the archdiocese's parishes, which are separately incorporated; or $35 million in parish deposit funds the archdiocese moved off its books in 2005 — though she said there was arguably "something fishy about the transfer."

The parties have yet to litigate issues related to Faith in Our Future, the Cousins Center or the $11 million fixed income account.

Kelley ruled in January 2013 that forcing the archdiocese to tap some portion of its cemetery funds would not violate its free exercise of religion. But U.S. District Judge Rudolph T. Randa overturned her ruling, and Randa's decision is now on appeal before the 7th Circuit. That decision, whenever it comes down, is likely to generate an appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Read more by clicking on the following:  Abuse victims call Archdiocesan bankruptcy plan 'repugnant'